A Quick (ish) Finish

Yes, quick. Ish. You know how sometimes things don’t go exactly as you planned? That.

On Saturday, I decided I needed to make some new potholders. Don’t laugh. Once you see the state of the ones I have, you’ll understand. Be forewarned, they’re pretty icky!

 

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Well. This one kind of has a problem, wouldn’t you say? This, and the one behind HAS been washed…I know. Ick.

 

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One of the first projects I made when I was learning to knit. This one could stand to be felted a bit more.

 

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Remember these weaving looms? My son made these for me for Christmas one year when he was MUCH younger. They’ve been well-used, but I hate to see them ruined.

 

When I was in Joann Fabrics last week, I picked up a yard of Insul-Bright. Did you know there’s an oven mitt pattern right on the instruction sheet? That reminded me of the way Mountain Mist batting used to include a quilt pattern in every package. Reminded me of, but isn’t quite as cool. Anyway, I decided to just use that pattern rather than make my own. Ish. I went so far as to glue the paper pattern onto the back of a cereal box before I cut it out. If it worked well, it might make a great quick gift, and I wanted to keep the pattern intact.

 

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My scrap bins yielded enough fabrics to make these, but it might have been easier to plan ahead.  I wasn’t too concerned with what I used. A fat quarter and a quarter yard was enough for the two. I also used just a few small scraps of a print (for the inside of the flaps on the potholder below) and a stripe (to bind the edges of the flaps).

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I had a fat quarter of this Michael Miller dot .
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This old Debbie Mumm print worked fine. There was exactly 1/4 yard of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I followed all of the instructions, so that each side of my mitt had four layers: outer fabric, Insul-Bright, cotton batting, and inner fabric. Then I zigzagged around all of the edges, just like the pattern said. (Can you believe this? I really did follow directions!) Then I zigzagged all eight layers together. And then…I tried to turn it right side out. Um. Yeah. No. I ended up with what looked more like a club than an oven mitt. Eight layers, all zigzagged together, do not turn easily. Trim the seams? Did that. It was just not happening. So, I decided to bind it and just get it done. Simple enough, right?

Have you ever tried to bind two edges that lie right next to each other? That little ‘v’ between the thumb and the hand…oy. That angle. Ugh. This is the real “ish” part of the project. Unsure how to create a miter that would work, no, not unsure, I was flat out confounded, I decided to cut the binding at that intersection and do it in two parts. Great, except I cut it too short. Went back and reattached the binding to itself to try again. And I ended up with the biggest wad of fabric on the planet, right there between the thumb and the hand. Dangit.

In the end, I fussed and fidgeted with it enough to get it to lie flat, ish. It’s an oven mitt, after all. *cue surly look* It’s done. And I’m not going to let you look too closely.

 

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I intended the white fabric to be on the inside because white, but…

 

I also made this cute little heart-shaped potholder that, frankly, was much quicker. This one really needed binding instead of being turned but I was completely out of the striped fabric that I wanted to use. Yes, I could have used something else but I didn’t want to, so I just did it like an envelope.

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There was no real pattern for this one, so I just drew my own.

 

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Even though I ended up not binding this one, four layers rather than eight made it much easier to turn
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I pinned through all the layers, just to keep it from shifting, and used Wonder Clips around the outside edge.

I haven’t decided yet if I’ll make more of these. For sure I will not follow directions. See where it got me? But next time I might make sure I have enough to bind with. And maybe I’ll figure that binding out before I start. And maybe, just maybe, I will make a square potholder. Ish.